BRIDGES

Programs

BRIDGES Programs

BRIDGES U

Attend College and Work

Designed to give extra support to adult students who have not graduated yet, want to attend and succeed at a two-year college, and also want to work/volunteer.

NEEDS
Students with disabilities often drop out of college due to challenges with executive functioning, self-determination, and adapting to all of the changes that come with being a young, independent adult. Students who have received special education services in high school have a higher probability of success in college-level programs and classes if they have extra support services that go beyond accommodations.

SOLUTION

To meet this need, Seattle Public Schools is creating a new pilot program called BRIDGES U (BU).

GOAL
The goal of BRIDGES U is to give extra support to adult students in special education who are 18-21 years old, have not graduated yet, want to attend and succeed at a two-year college, are willing to participate in college activities and clubs, and also want to work/volunteer.

HOW IT WORKS

The student is dually enrolled in Seattle Public Schools and one of the local Seattle Colleges (North Seattle, Seattle Central, South Seattle, or Seattle Vocational Institute). The student goes through the college admissions and registration process like any other student and has access to Disability Support Services (DSS) through the college. Each student in BRIDGES U is assigned to a Seattle Public Schools certified special education teacher who acts as the student’s IEP case manager.  The BU teacher provides specially designed instruction, guidance, support, and connection to college activities and clubs. However, direct contact between student and teacher may not be as frequent as what happens in high school.  ORCA cards are provided. Students are expected to demonstrate the maturity to learn and have the skills to succeed at the college level. College classes are not modified for students.  If a student needs accommodations, they work with the college’s disability support services office.  Students also want to work/volunteer and be a part of college life. Parents are expected to be supportive, but also need to let their young adult independently navigate college and work.  Students are encouraged to meet as many of their high school graduation requirements before coming to BRIDGES U.  However, students who have officially graduated from high school are no longer Seattle Public School students and cannot attend BRIDGES U.

COSTS

The adult student is responsible for all tuition, fees, books, material costs, etc. However, the IEP case manager will help the student navigate and access the financial aid options available through the college and other funding sources.  If students are participating in the 13th year Promise Scholarship program, they need to graduate in order to receive the benefits of the 13th year Promise Scholarship.  This means that they would not be eligible for the BU program given that they have graduated.

BRIDGES U options

Each college has their own unique programs and class offerings. Depending on a student’s college placement scores and program-specific prerequisites, BRIDGES U students can access a wide variety of programs at Seattle area colleges.  Examples include:

  • Running Start
  • Apprenticeship and Education Center
  • Learning Center at Seattle Vocational Institute (SVI)
  • Adult Basic Education (ABE)
  • Integrated Basic Education and Skills Training (IBEST)
  • ACHIEVE at Highline College

Running Start

Program for qualified students who wish to take college courses that satisfy high school graduation requirements and earn college credit.  Need to have taken and passed at least one Running Start course while in high school.

Apprenticeship and Education Center

The Georgetown Campus trains more than 4,000 apprentices and journey-level workers annually in 20 different trades. Each of the training centers provides classroom and laboratory space with training equipment focused upon specific trade training needs.

Each program offers certificate options. The variety of certificates plus an associate degree option provide students with the flexibility to reach their personal goals. The apprenticeship programs offer immediate employment while training at family-wage jobs. Students learn in the classroom and labs with the college, and obtain practical hands-on experience in the industry. Upon completion, the student is knowledgeable and experienced in his or her chosen trade or occupation.  Georgetown Campus

Learning Center at Seattle Vocational Institute (SVI)

The Learning Center Seattle program is free of charge to eligible students, who are 16 to 21 years old, and have not completed high school but want to earn their GED® to go on to college or technical training program (tuition–free) and/or start a career. Students who meet the age eligibility requirements and already received a GED® certificate are also eligible to enroll in the Learning Center Seattle program.  Learning Center at SVI

Adult Basic Education (ABE)

Adult Basic Education classes are for adults who are already proficient in the English language but wish to improve their basic reading, writing and math skills.

Reading instruction emphasizes comprehension, vocabulary development, critical thinking and study skills.

Writing skills include the review and application of language and grammar rules, correct usage and spelling, and writing sentences and paragraphs. Students learn to use writing as a mode of personal expression, as a valuable learning tool and as a necessary skill when pursuing a job, earning a living or acquiring further education.

Math instruction includes skills development in addition, subtraction, multiplication and division of whole numbers, fractions, decimals and percentages, and introduction to algebra and geometry.

Integrated Basic Education and Skills Training (IBEST)

Integrated Basic Education and Skills Training (IBEST) programs create an opportunity for students at the basic skills level, both English as Second Language (ESL) and Adult Basic Education (ABE) students, to enroll in college level programs and earn a certificate in a high demand industry.

In an IBEST classroom, a basic skills instructor and a college subject instructor teach together, with methods to support both literacy education and workforce skills. Students attend an additional IBEST support class to support success and improve English and math skills.

ACHIEVE at Highline College

ACHIEVE is a comprehensive post-secondary transition program for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities.  It includes credit and non-credit classes, intensive advising, involvement in campus life, community-based internships, and job placement services. All ACHIEVE students are assigned an Educational Case Manager and Employment Consultant who work with the student to draft and implement a comprehensive, individual plan for employment. Specific courses are determined based on skills and competencies needed for the student to achieve his or her identified employment goal(s).  Student referrals are made by central district staff to ACHIEVE.  Eligibility and enrollment is determined by ACHIEVE staff on a competitive basis and applications are submitted directly to the ACHIEVE program by the students and/or their families.

BRIDGES U ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA

  • Disability category not important.
  • IEP team decision to join BRIDGES, but central office makes site assignment.
  • Not graduated yet, but have completed as many of their high school graduation requirements as possible.
  • 18-21 years old before coming to BRIDGES U.
  • At least a middle school level of academic skills. Students need to be able to meet minimum college test placement requirements and prerequisites to succeed in most of the college classes/programs. However, program prerequisites vary widely and some programs may put more emphasis on completing program outcomes than academic achievement. This may mean that a student would need to start with adult basic education classes, but with the idea to advance further.
  • Willing and able to take at least one class per quarter at the college and have a good chance of succeeding in that class. This also means good attendance.
  • Willing and able to join at least one campus club or organization.
  • Willing and able to work and/or volunteer/internship while dually enrolled with SPS and the college.
  • Complete the BU B-Pass
  • Have an understanding from the parents that the student is an adult attending college, making their own choices about courses, jobs, campus experiences, etc.

BU-North North Seattle College: Anne Anderson, aeanderson@seattleschools.org

BU-Central Seattle Central College: Erik Bishop, ebbishop@seattleschools.org
 
BU-South, South Seattle College, West Seattle; South Seattle College, Georgetown Campus: Judy Camann, jecamann@seattleschools.org

BU at Highline College ACHIEVE ProgramMegan Sanchez, mcsanchez@seattleschools.org

Bridge 1: Embedded Internships with Hospitals, Businesses, and Organizations

Designed for students with intellectual & developmental disabilities who have moderate to high independent work & daily living skills.  They can handle working a full day four days/week in a large and/or sensitive real-work setting.  Students volunteer/intern at local hospitals after meeting an organization’s volunteer requirements.

Embedded Internships with Hospitals, Businesses, and Organizations

Designed for adult students with intellectual and developmental disabilities who have adequate independent work and daily living skills.  Students volunteer or intern at local hospitals or businesses after meeting prerequisite and screening requirements.  

BRIDGES 1 Programs at Hospitals

  • Swedish Hospital Ballard
  • Swedish Hospital First Hill and Cherry Hill.
  • Providence Mt. St. Vincent, West Seattle
  • Project Search at Children’s Hospital (last year of school eligibility only)

Program Description

These programs are designed to emphasize independent functioning in a real work setting at local hospitals. The goal is to get students with developmental disabilities connected with real, meaningful employment after they leave the school system with the help of adult service support agencies.

In order to work at hospital sites, students have to meet strict hospital volunteer requirements . This means that they have to demonstrate appropriate behaviors/social interaction skills, follow directions, and eventually be independent and productive.  An application, interview with the hospital volunteer coordinator, and TB tests are required.

Examples of work duties include recycling, clean linen delivery, warehouse work, washing dishes, delivering mail, copying and packet assembly, sanitizing multiple locations, kitchen and cafeteria work, data entry, package delivery, etc.

PROJECT SEARCH at CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL:
Please note, Project Search at Children’s Hospital is unique in that it is designed for students who are eligible for services through the Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) and in their last year of school district service eligibility.

Project Search at Seattle Children’s Hospital

Here’s the link to the form “2021-22 Seattle Children’s Project Search Application

Prerequisite Skills

Students will:

  • Have excellent attendance.
  • Be able to consistently follow a dress code.
  • Be able to complete tasks independently.
  • Be cooperative and courteous with others.
  • Follow instructions and accept constructive criticism.
  • Be able to communicate needs, wants, and interests

Teachers, Locations, and Student Hours for BRIDGES 1

Swedish Hospital at Ballard
5300 Tallman Ave NW, Seattle, WA 98107 
M-F 8:55 AM – 3:45 PM; Early Dismissal Wednesdays at 2:30 PM
Maggie Meister, 206-781-6261, mumeister @seattleschools.org

Swedish Hospital at First Hill & Cherry Hill campuses
747 Broadway, Seattle, WA 98122
M-F 8:55 AM – 3:45 PM; Early Dismissal Wednesdays at 2:30 PM
Kelly Walker, 206-386-6727, kawalker@seattleschools.org

Providence Mt. St. Vincent at West Seattle
4831 35th Ave SW, Seattle, WA 98126
M-F 8:55 AM – 3:45 PM; Early Dismissal Wednesdays at 2:30 PM
Joseph Baird, 917-450-0367, jdbaird@seattleschools.org

Project Search at Children’s Hospital (‘home base’ classroom location at Roosevelt Commons in U-District)
4300 Roosevelt NE, Seattle, WA 98105
M-F 8:55 AM – 3:45 PM; Early Dismissal Wednesdays at 2:30 PM
Sheila King, 206-491-0479,  smking@seattleschools.org

Bridge 2: Volunteer or Work in the Community

Designed for moderately to highly independent students who want to work and need varied levels of support in functional academics, social, and daily living skills. Students spend the majority of the day at local businesses & organizations in unpaid or paid positions based on each student’s strengths, preferences, interests, needs, & level of independence.

Bridge 2 Volunteer or Work in the Community

Designed for adult students with adequate independent work and daily living skills who may need varied levels of support in functional academics, self-management, social, and or daily living skills. Emphasis is on independent functioning, volunteering or paid work, and real-life learning activities in local businesses and organizations.

Program Description

These programs are designed to prepare students with skills and habits necessary for success in the world of work. Toward this end, partnerships are made with various companies and non-profit organizations.

Students are allowed on premises for skills training in exchange for volunteer services or assistance with tasks like mail sorting or merchandise cleaning and shelf arrangement. Some students work in paid employment opportunities while still being enrolled in the BRIDGES program.

As much as possible, specific tasks and jobs are aligned with a student’s strengths, needs, interests, and preferences.  Examples include:

  • Office assistant duties such as filing, organizing, mail delivery, etc.
  • Scanning books into inventory and filing books on memory stick onto shelf space by matching numbers
  • Cleaning the dining facility tables at the University of Washington HUB cafeteria or local retirement community dining rooms
  • Receiving donations, sorting, stocking and providing customer service at local food banks
  • Working at a grocery store as a courtesy clerk
  • Assisting in a preschool classroom

As a component of transition we partner with King County DDD and the School to Work program. If eligible, our students work with the King County School to Work program during their last year for employment development.

Prerequisite Skills

Students will:

  • Have excellent attendance.
  • Have safe behaviors around other vulnerable populations.
  • Have independent self-toileting, feeding, and clothes handling skills.
  • Be able to complete most tasks independently after instruction.
  • Be able to recognize basic community safety signs.
  • Want to live as independent, employed adults and be open to instruction that leads to this outcome.
  • Gain basic Metro independence skills, but this is not absolutely required. Intensive training is provided if needed.

Program Staff, Locations, and Student Hours BRIDGES 2

Middle College at Northgate Mall
Simon Youth Academy
401 NE Northgate Way Ste. #202, Seattle, WA 98125
M-F 8:55 AM – 3:45 PM; Early Dismissal Wednesdays at 2:30 PM
Main Office: 206-252-9900
Anne Anderson, 206-252-9904, aeanderson@seattleschools.org

Rainier Beach High School
8815 Seward Park Ave S Seattle, WA 98118
M-F 8:55 AM – 3:45 PM; Early Dismissal Wednesdays at 2:30 PM
Main Office: 206-252-6350
Renee Wong, 206-252-6462, rlwong@seattleschools.org

Roxhill Annex
MS WP-267
9430 30th Ave SW, Seattle, WA 98126
M-F 8:55 AM – 3:45 PM; Early Dismissal Wednesdays at 2:30 PM
Judy Camann, 206-252-9930,  jecamann@seattleschools.org 

Bridge 3: Daily Living, Community Inclusion, and Volunteering

Designed for adult students with significant cognitive and adaptive delays who need substantial support and supervision throughout the day. Emphasis is on instruction in life skills, community inclusion, pre-vocational activities, and volunteering or work in local businesses and organizations.

Bridge 3 Daily Living and Community Inclusion

Designed for students with significant cognitive and adaptive delays who need substantial support throughout the day. Emphasis is on instruction in life skills, community access, and pre-vocational activities. Opportunities to volunteer and work in the community depend on student skill set and need.

Program Description

BRIDGE 3 is designed to foster vocational and community independence in young adults with significant cognitive and adaptive challenges ages 18-21 years old who need small, supportive groups in order to succeed. Each program is run by a special education teacher and two full-time instructional assistants. Both in class and in the community, students are taught skills necessary to access actual work sites as well as those skills that promote safe, positive recreational experiences. Coordination with agencies such as DDA, DVR and School-to-Work is an important part of the program. Some examples of what is addressed in the community-based training program include:

  • Understanding and using money
  • Telling time to follow schedules
  • Computer skills
  • Street crossing and pedestrian safety
  • Social skills including conversation, self-advocacy, requesting help or breaks
  • Other life skills depending on individual student need (hygiene, proper meal etiquette, etc.)

Prerequisite Skills

Students will:

  • Be able to feed self with proper utensils.
  • Be able to use bathroom and wash hands independently.
  • Be able to remain in their areas without running from staff.
  • Refrain from verbally, physically, and sexually aggressive and/or inappropriate behaviors.

Program Staff, Locations, and Student Hours BRIDGES 3

Ingraham High School
1819 N. 135th, Seattle, WA 98133
M-F 8:55 AM – 3:45 PM; Early Dismissal Wednesdays at 2:30 PM
Main Office: 206-252-3880
Margaret Ward,206-252-4018  mmward@seattleschools.org
Heidi Leyton, 206-252-4019, hjleyton@seattleschools.org


Rainier Beach High School

8815 Seward Park Ave S Seattle, WA 98118
M-F 8:55 AM – 3:45 PM; Early Dismissal Wednesdays at 2:30 PM
Main Office: 206-252-6350
Renee Wong, 206-252-6462,  rlwong@seattleschools.org

Roxhill Building
9430 30th Ave SW, Seattle, WA 98126
M-F 8:55 AM – 3:45 PM; Early Dismissal Wednesdays at 2:30 PM
Leo Schons, 206-252-9930,  lhschons@seattleschools.org

Bridge 4: Daily Living and Community Inclusion for Those with Medically-fragile Conditions

Designed for young adults who have medically-fragile conditions and require a high level of support. Emphasis is on life skills, community inclusion, and pre-vocational activities.

Bridge 4 Daily Living and Community Access for Those with Medically-fragile Conditions

Designed for young adults who have medically-fragile conditions and require a high level of support. Emphasis is on life skills, community access, and pre-vocational activities.

Program Description

BRIDGE 4 is designed to assist students with medically fragile needs in a community-based transition program. This is a collaborative effort between families, support service providers; School Nurse, OT/PT, Speech Pathologist, Assistive Technology, and adult service providers; DDA, Vocational Rehabilitation, and School-To-Work.

Planning with representatives from these groups develops the basic parameters of the program. The program uses a person-centered approach which identifies the needs and interests of each individual student and their families.

Schedules are then developed by the student’s team. Emphasis is on the following instructional areas: communication, independent living, vocational/employment, social/leisure/recreation, and life-long learning opportunities.

Prerequisite Skills

Students will:

  • Be eligible for special education services due to medically-fragile conditions
  • Continue to have education/transition needs after four years of high school
  • Have a wheelchair in adequate condition for community access

Program Staff, Locations, and Hours​ BRIDGES 4

Rainier Beach High School
8815 Seward Park Ave S Seattle, WA 98118
M-F 8:55 AM – 3:45 PM; Early Dismissal Wednesdays at 2:30 PM
Main Office: 206-252-6350
Ellen Carleton, eacarleton@seattleschools.org