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    Student Voices from Naramore Art Show
    Posted on 05/13/2019
    Naramore 2019 poster with student art work and dates of exhibition.

    Student Voices from Naramore Art Show

    The Naramore Art Show celebrates over 200 artworks by Seattle Public Schools middle and high school students at the Seattle Art Museum’s Community Corridor. Seattle Public Schools has held the Naramore Art Show since 1985 to celebrate the success of our highest achieving arts students and share their learning with our community.

    Floyd A. Naramore, whose name is honored by this exhibition, was a visionary architect who invested deeply in his community and in the education of our students. He designed over 22 schools, including Roosevelt, Garfield, Cleveland high schools, and several middle school buildings.

    Students participating in the Naramore Art Show shared the inspiration behind their artwork.

     

    Photo of “Girls Will be Girls” by Ruby StricklandOverall and 3D: “Girls Will be Girls” by Ruby Strickland, Ingraham High School

    “I’ve never done anything in 3D and wanted to try it out. I used barbie dolls and glued them together, and growing up, I played with a lot of barbie dolls. The focus of my work is on nature. I used to be in the Girl Scouts, and we didn’t do a lot of activities outside. Meanwhile, when I joined the Boy Scouts Adventuring Crew, we were involved in a lot of nature activities. Through this piece, I wanted to show my relationship with nature and support other girls for being more adventurous.”

     

    Photo of “Transgender” by James MeyersMixed Media: “Transgender” by James Meyers, The Center School

    “The inspiration came from a friend who took an ASL (American Sign Language) class in community college. She said that the word ‘transgender’ comes from the combination of three words in sign language: myself, becoming, beautiful. The blocks on the bottom of the piece spell ‘transgender,’ and the hand symbols in the center join together to say ‘transgender.’ I wanted to amplify the voices of trans people going through that process of coming into their gender as they discover their own beauty.”

     

    Photo of “Amity” by Grace SandersonPainting: “Amity” by Grace Sanderson, Ballard High School

    “I was inspired by human expression and portraiture. I came across a photo of a woman in the sun. It was a calm image with an artistic tone that I wanted to translate into art. Life and human expression inspires me. I titled the work after seeing the word “amity” in the dictionary. It carried a positive meaning, and I wanted to associate my work with a positive theme.”

     

    Drawing: “Untitled 1” by Bella Daly, NOVA

    Photo of “Untitled 1” by Bella Daly, NOVA

    “My teacher, Terrance, gave out an assignment find something tyrannical about society and take action. So, I chose society’s perceptions of beauty and the way it is represented, which many people struggle to fit into what is perceived to be ‘attractive.’ These standards are specifically catered to profit from insecurities. I decided that through art, I would start depicting people with features that are not represented and showcase how much beauty they hold.”

     

    Photo of “Mt. Stuart” by Nathan HarmonPhotography: “Mt. Stuart” by Nathan Harmon, Roosevelt High School

    “I took this photo using a point and shoot camera during a climb to Mt. Stuart, the highest non-volcanic peak in Washington State. In the foreground is my brother Blake and a stack of rocks called cairns, which help to direct climbers up the largely unmarked route to the summit.”

     

    Photo of “Tired” by Kailey Nguyen, Middle School: “Tired” by Kailey Nguyen, Mercer International Middle School

    “I saw a random photo and used charcoal to draw it. I hope to go into the arts in the future as part of my career. I want to continue exploring realistic drawing and charcoal.”

     

    Photo of “Untitled” by Christian EstrellaSchool Digital: “Untitled” by Christian Estrella, Cleveland High School

    “I took a photo on my cellphone and illustrated it to get the shadows right. I like graphic arts and pay attention to the details in the games I play.”

    The award recipients in each category were chosen by a panel of judges from the arts and creative industries using a rubric. To see more artwork, visit the Naramore Art Show at the Seattle Art Museum’s Community Corridor until May 26, 2019.

     

     

    Naramore Art Show 2019

    The Naramore Art Show celebrates over 200 artworks by Seattle Public Schools middle and high school students at the Seattle Art Museum’s Community Corridor — and it's FREE!

    Exhibition dates:
    April 3 - May 26, 2019
    Awards Ceremony & Teen Night Out:
    May 3, 2019, 6 - 7 p.m. 

    Seattle Public Schools has held the Naramore Art Show since 1985 to celebrate the success of our highest achieving arts students and share their learning with our community.

    Read about Naramore on the Seattle Art Museum website.