High School Mathematics

High School Mathematics Courses

This is a comprehensive list of the courses available in the SPS Math Course Catalog.  Please refer to the Math Course Sequence documents (Course progressions leading to AP math, Course progressions leading to IB math) to view math course trajectories.  Contact schools for specific course offerings.

Courses:

Course Name – Course Codes:

Algebra 1 A/B – HMA2684/HMA2686

Students model and analyze real-world and mathematical situations using linear, exponential, quadratic equations, inequalities and functions. Students will summarize, represent, and interpret single variable and bi-variate categorical and quantitative data.

Note: For HS students only, Algebra 1 may be taken concurrently with either Geometry in order for students to access advanced coursework by 12th grade. Course content and expectations will NOT be adjusted for students who takes classes concurrently.

Algebra 1A is the first semester of a year-long Algebra 1 course. In this course, students begin with simplifying expressions, solving linear and literal equations and justifying steps using mathematical properties. Next, students engage in a deeper analysis and formalization of functions in context. Students identify and describe function features such as domain and range, increasing and decreasing intervals, and discrete versus continuous. Students represent arithmetic sequences explicitly and recursively using function notation, then evaluate and interpret meaning of solutions within a context. Students build upon their prior knowledge of linear functions to model real-world situations using multiple representations and using multiple forms of linear equations. Students extend properties of exponents to rational exponents and use these properties to create equivalent expressions in both exponential and radical form. Students model and evaluate exponential growth and decay contexts (including geometric sequences) using multiple representations and fluently translate between representations. Students compare and contrast the properties of linear functions with exponential functions.

Algebra 1B is the second semester of a year-long Algebra 1 course. In this course, students model real life situations with quadratics functions using multiple representations and fluently translate between representations. Students manipulate quadratic functions by using algebraic properties to highlight key features, determine contextual information, and solve problems. Students graph quadratic functions to highlight key features.  Students write and solve quadratic equations by factoring, completing the square, and using the quadratic formula. Students solve linear-linear, linear-exponential, and linear-quadratic systems of equations algebraically and graphically which model real-world situations. Students interpret their solution to a system in the context of the problem (which may include no solutions, one solution, two solutions, or infinite solutions). Students solve and graph one variable inequalities and graph two variable and systems of inequalities. Students write constraints and identify viable solutions for real-world problems using systems of linear inequalities. Students create a line of best fit given a scatter plot or data points. Students will be able to create an estimated line of best fit by hand and compute the least-squares line of best fit using technology. Students use technology to fit non‐linear curves to data. Students will create and interpret appropriate data displays and summary statistics of one-variable quantitative data.

Other Algebra 1 Courses

Algebra 1 A/B H – HMA265/HMA2687

This is an honors-level course that requires deeper connection between concepts and application to new contexts. Algebra 1A/B H has an honors designation and qualifies for an extra 0.5 GPA quality point.  

Note: Students do not need to be accelerated to participate in honors-level coursework. 

Algebra Lab 1A/B – HMA2381/HMA2382

Algebra Lab 1 provides support for students to strengthen their understanding of concepts in the Algebra 1 course. Algebra Lab can be taken concurrently with an Algebra 1 course, but is not a replacement for Algebra 1. This course counts towards elective credit.  

Course Name – Course Codes:

Algebra 2A/B – HMA2688/HMA2690

Students model and analyze real-world and mathematical situations using polynomial, radical, exponential, logarithmic, functions and equations.  Students model and analyze real-world and mathematical situations using rational and trigonometric functions and equations. Students use statistical techniques to evaluate linear models for bivariate data and normal models for single variable quantitative data.  

Prerequisite: 1.0 Algebra 1 credit

AND

Prerequisite or Co-requisite: 1.0 Geometry credit

Note: For HS students only, Geometry may be taken concurrently with either Algebra 2 in order for students to access advanced coursework by 12th grade.  Course content and expectations will NOT be adjusted for students who takes classes concurrently.

Algebra 2A is the first semester of a year-long Algebra 2 course.  In this course, students interpret key features of quadratic functions by analyzing equations, graphs, and tables, and use quadratic functions to model situations and solve problems. Students connect prior work with quadratics to understand the parabola as a conic section. Students compare similarities and differences between quadratic and absolute value functions.  Students extend their understanding of number to the complex numbers, and find complex solutions to quadratic equations. Students determine the behavior of polynomial functions and identify the key features of higher order polynomial functions by investigating structure/behavior of their graphs and equations. Students apply the Remainder Theorem and utilize factoring, long division or synthetic division to identify the zeros of a polynomial. Students extend their understanding of complex numbers to determine the complex roots of a higher order polynomials. Students solve systems of functions, including polynomial functions, graphically. Students solve equations with rational exponents or radical expressions and identify the properties of radical functions. Students create equivalent expressions using the properties of exponents to solve rational, exponential, or radical equations. Students identify solutions as rational, irrational, and/or extraneous. Students model real-world situations with exponential functions. Students understand the definition of a logarithm as the inverse of an exponential function. Students incorporate the definition of logarithms and properties of exponents to solve equations and interpret solutions within a context. Students extend their knowledge of exponential functions as they model situations with compound interest and make use of Euler’s number, e. 

Algebra 2B is the second semester of a year-long Algebra 2 course. In this course, students interpret categorical and quantitative data to make inferences and justify conclusions based on statistical simulations, studies, surveys, and experiments. Students estimate population percentiles by analyzing the normal curve. Students gather, summarize, evaluate, and interpret data in order to answer statistical questions. Students assess linear models of bivariate data using residual plots and the correlation coefficient.  Students learn to manipulate rational expressions, write rational equations, graph rational functions, and identify key features of rational functions, such as end-behavior, intercepts, increasing, etc. Students revisit the concept of an extraneous solution. Students use factoring and the long division algorithm to rewrite rational expressions, equations, and functions into equivalent forms. Students use the unit circle to define a radian and use symmetry to extend the values of trigonometric functions into all four quadrants.  Students determine properties of trigonometric graphs by “unfolding” the unit circle. Students explore sine and cosine functions and their graphs to model periodic situations and explore the effects of transformations on the amplitude, period, and midline of the function.

Other Algebra 2 Courses

Algebra 2A/B H – HMA289/HMA2691

This is an honors-level course that requires deeper connection between concepts and application to new contexts. Algebra 2A/B H has an honors designation and qualifies for an extra 0.5 GPA quality point.  

Note: Students do not need to be accelerated to participate in honors-level coursework. 

Algebra Lab 2A/B – HMA0571/HMA0572

Algebra Lab 2 provides support for students to strengthen their understanding of concepts in the Algebra 2 course. Algebra Lab 2 can be taken concurrently with an Algebra 2 course, but is not a replacement for Algebra 2. This course counts towards elective credit.  

Course Name – Course Codes:

AP Calculus AB A/B – HMA1929/HMA1932

AP Calculus AB is designed to be the equivalent of a one-semester college calculus course and prepares students to take the AP Calculus AB Exam in May. Units include limits, differentiation and applications, integration, and differential equations and their applications.

Prerequisite: 1.0 Precalculus credit

AP Calculus AB has an Advanced Placement designation and qualifies for an extra 1.0 GPA quality point.  In AP Calculus AB A, students build on prior knowledge to understand the concept of a limit.  Students learn techniques for determining limits, and how to evaluate limits for functions that are not continuous.  Students consider what an instantaneous rate of change at a point means, and from this develop the definition of a derivative.  Students find derivatives of the many function types they have studied in previous courses.  They develop a toolbox of methods for determining the derivative of different function types.  Students apply derivatives to understand the relationships between position, velocity, and acceleration, and to related rates.  Students analyze key features of functions through analyzing their derivatives.   

In AP Calculus AB B, students develop the understanding of an integral through approximation of area and accumulation of change.  Students apply the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus to integrate functions.  Students study and learn to solve differential equations.  Students consider the applications of integration to find area under a curve and volumes of 3-dimensional solids.

Course Name – Course Codes:

AP Calculus BC A/B – HMA1938/HMA1939

AP Calculus BC is designed to be equivalent of a two-semester college calculus course. Units include limits, differentiation, and integration, differential equations, applications of integration, parametric functions, and sequences and series. This course prepares students to take the AP Calculus BC Exam in May.

Prerequisite: 1.0 Precalculus Honors credit

AP Calculus BC has an Advanced Placement designation and qualifies for an extra 1.0 GPA quality point. In AP Calculus BC A, students build on prior knowledge to understand the concept of a limit.  Students learn techniques for determining limits, and how to evaluate limits for functions that are not continuous.  Students consider what an instantaneous rate of change at a point means, and from this develop the definition of a derivative.  Students find derivatives of the many function types they have studied in previous courses.  They develop a toolbox of methods for determining the derivative of different function types.  Students apply derivatives to understand the relationships between position, velocity, and acceleration, and to related rates.  Students analyze key features of functions through analyzing their derivatives.  Students develop the understanding of an integral through approximation of area and accumulation of change.  Students apply the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus to integrate functions.  Students learn advanced techniques such as integration by parts, using partial fractions, and improper integrals.

In AP Calculus BC B, students study and learn to solve differential equations, including using Euler’s method and logistic models.  Students consider the applications of integration to find area under a curve, volumes of 3-dimensional solids, and arc length. Students apply differentiation and integration to parametric equations, vector-valued functions, and polar curves. Students study infinite sequences and series and determine whether they converge or diverge.  Students understand how power series, including Taylor and Maclaurin series, and functions are related.

Course Name – Course Codes:

AP Statistics A/B – HMA2530/HMA2531

AP Calculus BC has an Advanced Placement designation and qualifies for an extra 1.0 GPA quality point. In AP Calculus BC A, students build on prior knowledge to understand the concept of a limit.  Students learn techniques for determining limits, and how to evaluate limits for functions that are not continuous.  Students consider what an instantaneous rate of change at a point means, and from this develop the definition of a derivative.  Students find derivatives of the many function types they have studied in previous courses.  They develop a toolbox of methods for determining the derivative of different function types.  Students apply derivatives to understand the relationships between position, velocity, and acceleration, and to related rates.  Students analyze key features of functions through analyzing their derivatives.  Students develop the understanding of an integral through approximation of area and accumulation of change.  Students apply the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus to integrate functions.  Students learn advanced techniques such as integration by parts, using partial fractions, and improper integrals.

In AP Calculus BC B, students study and learn to solve differential equations, including using Euler’s method and logistic models.  Students consider the applications of integration to find area under a curve, volumes of 3-dimensional solids, and arc length. Students apply differentiation and integration to parametric equations, vector-valued functions, and polar curves. Students study infinite sequences and series and determine whether they converge or diverge.  Students understand how power series, including Taylor and Maclaurin series, and functions are related.

AP Statistics has an Advanced Placement designation and qualifies for an extra 1.0 GPA quality point.  In this course, three big ideas are considered – variation and distribution, patterns and uncertainty, and data-based predictions, decisions, and conclusions. In the first semester, students learn how to display, summarize, and interpret data on single- and two variable quantitative and categorical variables. They learn how to fit models to data (a normal model to quantitative data, a linear model to bivariate data), evaluate the appropriateness of those models, and use the models to make predictions. They learn about the types of statistical studies including observational studies, experiments, and surveys. They learn how randomness and randomization are key parts of gathering unbiased data in any statistical study. Students study randomness through the lens of probability, focusing on conditional probability, binomial probabilities, normal probabilities, and random variables. Students apply their understanding of randomness and probability to develop the concept of a sampling distribution and its uses. 

In the second semester, students build on their understanding of sampling distributions to make inferences about populations based on the results of a single sample. Students use the sampling distribution of a sample proportion to create an estimate of a population value from a sample using a confidence interval based on the normal distribution. They also learn how to use conditional probability to determine the likelihood of a particular sample occurring given it came from a specific population, leading to the process of a hypothesis test. Students extend these two skills (creating confidence intervals and conducting hypothesis tests) to make inferences about the mean of a population using the t-distribution. They also learn how to compare samples from two different populations using normal and t-distributions. Students make inferences about categorical data in multiple categories using the chi-square distribution. Finally, students extend their work with linear regression to determine confidence intervals and conduct hypothesis tests on the slope of a regression line. 

Course Name – Course Codes:

Bridge to College Math A/B – HMA7952/HMA7953

Bridge to College Mathematics is a year-long course focusing on the key mathematics readiness standards and mathematical practices. The first semester of this course addresses key Algebra I standards essential for college- and career-readiness with a focus on linear relationships and proportional reasoning. The second semester of this course addresses key Algebra II standards essential for college- and career-readiness with a focus on exponential and quadratic functions and equations, and statistical analysis. 

Prerequisite: Seniors who have taken Algebra 2 and want to use this course as a graduation pathway as reflected on their high school and beyond plan.

The Bridge to College Math course is a year-long math course that focuses on successfully transitioning students from high school to college level mathematics. This is a senior only course and earning 1.0 credit in Bridge to College Math, with a D or higher, will fulfill one of the graduation math pathway requirements. In addition, students who earn a B or better in the second semester of the Bridge course are eligible to enter credit-bearing math course work in any of the State of Washington Community and Technical Colleges. The Bridge to College Math course focuses on the key readiness standards from the Washington State Mathematics K-12 Learning Standards as well as the eight Standards of Mathematical Practices needed for students to be ready to under take post- secondary academic or career preparation in non-STEM fields or majors. 

The first semester of the course consists of four units: Algebraic Expressions, Equations, Measurement and Proportional Reasoning, and Linear functions. The second semester of the course consists of four units: Linear Systems of Equations, Exponential Functions and Intro to Logarithms, Quadratic Functions, and Summarizing and Interpreting Statistical Data.

This course uses the Bridge to College Math course curriculum materials developed by the Washing State Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OPSI). It is designed to engage students in conceptual learning. Each unit includes a “hook” activity at the beginning to increase students interest and accessibility through examining relevant contexts. Students will complete a pre-assessment to identify prior math experiences and understandings, followed by several days of tasks that deepen student mathematical understanding. Each unit also includes at least one formative assessment lesson, allowing the teacher to adapt instruction and learning during the remainder of the unit. 

Course Name – Course Codes:

BUS 130 Business Math – HMA3865

One semester Business Math college course.  Instruction in math functions & prepares students for business classes. Eligible students can earn Edmonds College credits. 

Prerequisite: 1.0 Algebra 1 credit AND 1.0 Geometry credit. 

Available to students in 10th to 12th grade

This one semester course is equivalent to a one-quarter Business Mathematics college course. Students are eligible to earn 5.0 college credit after completing this course (tuition fees apply). The course includes instruction and review of basic math functions to prepare students for business classes. Topics may include using ratio-proportion, percents, estimating, basic algebra, trade/cash discounts, promissory notes, credit terms, and other consumer related activities. Although this course does not fulfill the math requirement for four-year degrees, it does fulfill the math requirement for many two-year Associate in Technical Arts (ATA) degrees. Including Accounting, Business Information Technology, Business Management, Construction Management, Culinary Arts, Horticulture, Hospitality and Tourism, Medical Information Technology, and others.  Completion of this course with a D or higher fulfills the high school math graduation pathway requirement. 

Note: College in the High School courses can be completed in one semester for 1.0 math credit.

Other BUS 130 Business Math courses

BUS 130 Business Math A/B – HMA3866/HMA3867

This two semester course is equivalent to a one-quarter Business Mathematics college course.  Students are eligible to earn 5.0 college credit after completing these courses (tuition fees apply).  The content in these courses will mirror the content in the one semester course, but is presented over the full school year.

Course Name – Course Codes:

Calculus A/B – HMA3322/HMA3323

Students enrolled in the course will study elementary functions, limits, differential and integral calculus and its applications.

Prerequisite: 1.0 Precalculus credit

This course begins with a study of some Precalculus topics and then moves to a study of introductory calculus. Students study elementary functions, limits, differential and integral calculus and its applications. It is not the intent of this course to prepare students for taking the Advanced Placement Calculus Exam. Students in this course are preparing for enrollment in Calculus in college.

Students will demonstrate an understanding of the concept of limits and the concept of numerical derivative and numerical integral.  Students will differentiate various functions including polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric. Students will integrate various functions including polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric.  Students will apply differentiation and integration procedures to find areas, volumes, and rates of change.

Course Name – Course Codes:

Calculus Topics Advanced A/B – HMA8448/HMA8449

Students enrolled in the course will study calculus topics that extend past those covered in AP Calculus AB, including Advanced Integration Techniques, Vector Calculus, Calculus with parametrics and an introduction to linear algebra.

Prerequisite: AP Calculus AB

Over the two semesters, the course will focus on the following 4 major topics: ADVANCED INTEGRATION TECHNIQUES: Integration by parts, trigonometric substitution, partial fractions, multiple integration methods, power series, Maclaurin series, Taylor series, and Taylor Polynomials.  VECTORS: 2D and 3D coordinate systems, dot product and projections, vector functions, and derivatives and integrals of Vectors. PARAMETRICS: 2D parametric equations, derivatives, and integrals; length of a curve; 3D parametric equations derivatives and integrals; polar plane coordinates derivatives and integrals.  INTRO TO LINEAR ALGEBRA: including but not limited to: linear equations systems and matrices, vectors, linear transformations, matrix algebra and inverses. 

Course Name – Course Codes:

Financial Algebra 1/2 – HMA2517/HMA2518

Students apply algebraic and mathematical modeling to practical business and personal finance.  These applications incorporate Algebra 1, Geometry, and Algebra 2 topics.

Pre-requisite: 1.0 Geometry credit

Financial Algebra is a year-long course for students who have completed Algebra I and Geometry. This course can serve as the third credit of math for students who elect to take an alternative to Algebra 2 for the third year math requirement. This course is also appropriate for students who have completed Algebra 2 and want to take a course specifically focusing on the mathematics of personal finance. The objectives of this course are not equivalent to the objectives for Algebra 2.

Financial Algebra combines algebraic and graphical approaches with practical business and personal finance applications. Students explore algebraic thinking patterns and functions in a financial context. This course is designed to build upon prior knowledge of math concepts and offers an applications based learning approach incorporating Algebra 1, Algebra 2, and Geometry topics connected to the real world. This algebra-based course features real-world algebra concepts found in banking, credit, income taxes, insurance, planning for retirement, and household budgeting. In these contexts, students will work with proportional relationships, linear, quadratic, and exponential functions and inequalities.  Students will be introduced to other functions like, cubic, logarithmic, square root, and piece-wise functions.  Students will represent, analyze, and interpret categorical and quantitative data by calculating statistics.  Students will perform regressions to create models of data. Calculate and analyze mortgage payments for a variety of loan programs, and create amortization tables for fixed and adjustable rate mortgage. Calculate and analyze future values of single-deposit and periodic retirement investments, Social Security and pension benefits, and life insurance. Analyze and calculate utility expenses, benefits of energy-saving appliances or systems, different rate plans using linear and piecewise functions. Analyze household budgets using a variety of graphs and models; develop and interpret cash flow charts and budget plans.

Other Financial Algebra courses

Financial Algebra A/B – CMA5701/CMA5702

This course has the same course description and objectives as Financial Algebra 1/2.  These course codes can be used if the teacher is dual certified in both Mathematics and Career and Technical Education (CTE).  With these course codes, students can receive 1.0 credit towards their math and CTE course requirements.  The credit will only be applied once to the overall credit count.  

Course Name – Course Codes:

Geometry A/B – HMA2692/HMA2694

Students formalize their understanding of angle relationships and triangle properties.  Students use geometric transformations and formal constructions to study congruence and similarity.  Students develop formal proofs of angle and triangle properties and relationships using precise language and notation.  

Students establish properties of right triangles (including trigonometric ratios), quadrilaterals, and circles and use these properties to write formal proofs and solve real-world and mathematical problems.  Students extend work with area and volume to investigate real-world modeling problems.  Students further develop probability concepts, focusing on conditional probability, independence, and compound events.

Prerequisite OR Co-requisite: 1.0 Algebra 1 credit

Note: For HS students only, Geometry may be taken concurrently with either Algebra 1 OR Algebra 2 in order for students to access advanced coursework by 12th grade.  Course content and expectations will NOT be adjusted for students who takes classes concurrently.

Geometry A is the first semester of a year-long Geometry course.  In this course, students formalize vocabulary definitions and notation. Students write formal proofs of angle and line relationships and triangle properties established informally in prior courses. Students analyze parallel and perpendicular lines on the coordinate plane, establish the slope criteria for parallel and perpendicular lines, and use them to solve problems. Students use geometric tools to make formal constructions of common geometric figures. Students use constructions to explore geometric relationships, concepts, and theorems. Students formalize their understanding of rigid and non-rigid transformations. Students identify and perform transformations of geometric figures on the coordinate plane and in space utilizing construction skills. Students establish congruency of triangles through transformations and establish criteria for triangle congruence (ASA, SAS, SSS). Students write formal proofs to show triangle congruence. Students identify different types of triangles on the coordinate plane by calculating slopes, midpoints, and distances to determine the triangle’s properties. Students develop a formal definition of similarity and establish criteria that can be used to prove two triangles are similar. Students experiment with dilated shapes in space and on the coordinate plane, calculate and use scale factors and proportional relationships to solve for missing information, and apply the properties of similarity to solve real world problems and prove theorems about triangles.  

Geometry B is the second semester of a year-long Geometry course. In this course, students use similarity to establish the trigonometric ratios for right triangles. Students solve real-world situations that can be modeled with right triangles using both the Pythagorean theorem and trigonometric ratios. Students formally prove the Pythagorean theorem using right triangle similarity and extend the Pythagorean theorem to the coordinate plane to develop the distance formula. Students establish and prove the characteristics and properties of special quadrilaterals and parallelograms both in space and on the coordinate plane. Students write formal proofs of quadrilateral properties.  Students calculate the probability of single or compound events. Students identify independent and dependent events by calculating their conditional probabilities. Students calculate the probability of a union, intersection, or complements of events in order to make informed decisions. Students establish the geometric relationships among chords, arcs, angles, and lines that are within or intersecting with circles. Students construct the inscribed and circumscribed circle of a triangle. Students apply the definition of similarity and congruence based on transformations to prove all circles are similar.  Students develop methods for computing areas and arc lengths of circles and establish the definition of radian measure. Students solve mathematical and modeling problems involving area and volume of two- and three-dimensional shapes. 

Other Geometry courses

Geometry A/B H – HMA2693/HMA2695

This is an honors-level course that requires deeper connection between concepts and application to new contexts. Geometry A/B H has an honors designation and qualifies for an extra 0.5 GPA quality point.  

Note: Students do not need to be accelerated to participate in honors-level coursework.

Geometry Lab A/B – HMA2383/HMA2384

Geometry Lab provides support for students to strengthen their understanding of concepts in the Geometry course. Geometry Lab can be taken concurrently with a Geometry course, but is not a replacement for Geometry. This course counts towards elective credit.  

Course Name – Course Codes:

IB Math ANAPP HL A/B – HMA8138/HMA8139

Analysis and Approaches Higher Level Year 1

IB Math Analysis and Approaches HL A and B are taken in the first year of a two-year course that is part of the IB Diploma Programme and prepares students to take the IB examination in May of their second year. This course develops important mathematical concepts in a comprehensible, coherent and rigorous way, with an emphasis on algebraic methods. Students solve real and abstract problems. This course has a strong emphasis on the ability to construct, communicate and justify correct mathematical arguments. Students develop the skills needed to continue in the study of mathematics and other STEM areas.  Topics are studied in greater depth and breadth than in Standard Level. For students interested in mathematics, engineering, physical sciences, economics, and STEM fields.  

Prerequisites: 1.0 Geometry credit AND 1.0 Algebra 2 credit

IB Math Analysis and Approaches HL A and B are taken in the first year of a two-year course that is part of the IB Diploma Programme. IB courses qualify for an extra 1.0 GPA quality point.  

THE IB-SPECIFIED CONTENT ADDRESSED IN THE FIRST YEAR OF IB MATH ANALYSIS AND APPROACHES HL INCLUDES Sequences and Series, Counting Principles and Binomial Theorem, Functions including Linear, quadratic, polynomial, and rational functions, Complex Numbers as solutions to polynomial equations, Exponential and Logarithmic functions, Statistics and Probability including sampling, descriptive statistics, linear regression, Geometry and Trigonometry including radian measure, trig ratios, and trigonometric functions and equations. 

Course Name – Course Codes:

IB Math ANAPP HL C/D – HMA8140/HMA8141

Analysis and Approaches Higher Level Year 2

IB Math Analysis and Approaches HL C and D are two semesters of a four-part course series.  Completion of all four parts is one component of the IB diploma Programme and prepares students to take the IB examination in May of their second year. This course develops important mathematical concepts in a comprehensible, coherent and rigorous way, with an emphasis on algebraic methods. Students solve real and abstract problems. This course has a strong emphasis on the ability to construct, communicate and justify correct mathematical arguments. Students develop the skills needed to continue in the study of mathematics and other STEM areas. Topics are studied in greater depth and breadth than in Standard Level. For students interested in mathematics, engineering, physical sciences, economics, and STEM fields.

Prerequisite: IB Math Analysis and Approaches HL A and B.

IB Math Analysis and Approaches HL C and D are taken in the second year of a two-year course that is part of the IB Diploma Programme. IB courses qualify for an extra 1.0 GPA quality point.

THE IB-SPECIFIED CONTENT ADDRESSED IN THE SECOND YEAR OF IB MATH ANALYSIS AND APPROACHES HL INCLUDES Differentiation – Limits and differentiation rules and graphical representations and applications including implicit differentiation and related rates, Derivative and Integration of exponential and logarithmic functions, Advanced Integration and Differential Equations, Vectors in 2-D and 3-D, Polar Form of Complex Numbers including Powers and Roots, and Probability Distributions including Binomial and Normal Distributions.

Course Name – Course Codes:

IB Math ANAPP SL A/B – HMA8134/HMA8135

Analysis and Approaches Standard Level Year 1

IB Math Analysis and Approaches SL A and B are two semesters of a four-part course series.  Completion of all fours parts is one component of the IB Diploma Programme and prepares students to take the IB examination in May of their second year.  This course develops important mathematical concepts in a comprehensible, coherent and rigorous way, with an emphasis on algebraic methods. Students solve real and abstract problems. This course has a strong emphasis on the ability to construct, communicate and justify correct mathematical arguments. Students develop the skills needed to continue in the study of mathematics and other STEM areas.  For students interested in mathematics, engineering, physical sciences, economics, and STEM fields.  

Prerequisites:  1.0 Algebra 1 credit AND 1.0 Geometry credit 

IB Math Analysis and Approaches SL A and B are taken in the first year of a two-year course that is part of the IB Diploma Programme.  IB courses qualify for an extra 1.0 GPA quality point.

THE IB-SPECIFIED CONTENT ADDRESSED IN THE FIRST YEAR OF IB MATH ANALYSIS AND APPROACHES SL INCLUDES Functions Basics, Linear and quadratic functions, Exponentials and logarithms, Statistics for univariate data, Statistics for bivariate data, Geometry and Trigonometry in 2-D and 3-D, and Probability.  

ADDITIONAL SPS-SPECIFIED CONTENT INCLUDES Operations of Complex Numbers and as solutions to quadratic equations, Polynomial arithmetic, Polynomial functions, and Fitting quadratic and exponential models.  This additional content includes material from Algebra 2 that is not in the IB SL content and addresses content required for SAT and college-readiness on the SBA

Course Name – Course Codes:

IB Math ANAPP SL C/D – HMA8136/HMA8137

Analysis and Approaches Standard Level Year 2

IB Math Analysis and Approaches SL C and D are two semesters of a four-part course series.  Completion of all four parts is one component of the IB Diploma Programme and prepares students to take the IB examination in May of their second year. This course develops important mathematical concepts in a comprehensible, coherent and rigorous way, with an emphasis on algebraic methods. Students solve real and abstract problems. This course has a strong emphasis on the ability to construct, communicate and justify correct mathematical arguments. Students develop the skills needed to continue in the study of mathematics and other STEM areas.  For students interested in mathematics, engineering, physical sciences, economics, and STEM fields. 

Prerequisite:  IB Math Analysis and Approaches A and B

IB Math Analysis and Approaches SL C and D are taken in the second year of a two-year course that is part of the IB Diploma Programme.  IB courses qualify for an extra 1.0 GPA quality point.

THE IB-SPECIFIED CONTENT ADDRESSED IN THE SECOND YEAR OF IB MATH ANALYSIS AND APPROACHES SL INCLUDES Sequences and Series, Differentiation, Rational functions, Integrations, Trigonometric Functions, Advanced Differentiation and integration, and Probability Distributions. 

ADDITIONAL SPS-SPECIFIED CONTENT INCLUDES Absolute Value and Piece-wise functions, Parabolas as a conic section, and Radical functions.  This additional content includes material from Algebra 2 that is not in the IB SL content and addresses content required for SAT and college-readiness on the SBA.

Course Name – Course Codes:

IB Math APPS HL A/B – HMA8146/HMA8147

Applications and Interpretations Higher Level Year 1

IB Math Applications and Interpretation HL A and B are two semesters of a four-part course series.  Completion of all four parts in one component of the IB Diploma Programme and prepares students to take the IB examination in May of their second year. This course emphasizes mathematical modeling and statistics. Students solve real-world problems, construct and communicate this mathematically and interpret the conclusions or generalizations.   Students develop strong technology skills and understand the links between theoretical and practical concepts in mathematics. For students interested in social sciences, natural sciences, medicine, statistics, business, engineering, some economics, psychology, design and other non-STEM fields.  Topics are studied in greater depth and breadth than in Standard Level.  

Prerequisites:  1.0 Geometry credit AND 1.0 Algebra 2 credit

IB Math Applications and Interpretation HL A and B are taken in the first year of a two-year course that is part of the IB Diploma Programme. IB courses qualify for an extra 1.0 GPA quality point. 

THE IB-SPECIFIED CONTENT ADDRESSED IN THE FIRST YEAR OF IB MATH APPLICATIONS AND INTERPRETATION HL INCLUDES Approximation, Estimation, Precision, and Error, Right Triangle Trigonometry, Coordinate Geometry and Vectors, Descriptive Statistics – Bivariate and univariate, Linear Functions and Regression, Power and Polynomial Functions, Exponential and Logarithmic Functions, Trigonometric Functions, and Probability.

Course Name – Course Codes:

IB Math APPS HL C/D – HMA8148/HMA8149

Applications and Interpretations Higher Level Year 2

IB Math Applications and Interpretation HL C and D are two semesters of a four-part course series.  Completion of all fourse parts is one component of the IB Diploma Programme and prepares students to take the IB examination in May of their second year. This course emphasizes mathematical modeling and statistics. Students solve real-world problems, construct and communicate this mathematically and interpret the conclusions or generalizations.   Students develop strong technology skills and understand the links between theoretical and practical concepts in mathematics. For students interested in social sciences, natural sciences, medicine, statistics, business, engineering, some economics, psychology, design and other non-STEM fields.  Topics are studied in greater depth and breadth than in Standard Level.  

Prerequisite:  IB Math Applications and Interpretation HL A and B.

IB Math Applications and Interpretation HL C and D are taken the second year of this two-year course that is part of the IB Diploma Programme.  IB courses qualify for an extra 1.0 GPA quality point.

THE IB-SPECIFIED CONTENT ADDRESSED IN THE SECOND YEAR OF IB MATH APPLICATIONS AND INTERPRETATION HL INCLUDES Matrices, Differential Calculus, Integration and Differential equations, Modeling Motion and Change in 2-D and 3-D, Random Variables and Probability Distributions, Hypothesis testing, and Graph Theory.

Course Name – Course Codes:

IB Math APPS SL A/B – HMA8142/HMA8143

Applications and Interpretations Standard Level Year 1

IB Math Applications and Interpretation SL A and B are two semesters of a four-part course series.  Completion of all four parts is one component of the IB Diploma Programme and prepares students to take the IB examination in May of their second year. This course emphasizes mathematical modeling and statistics. Students solve real-world problems, construct and communicate this mathematically and interpret the conclusions or generalizations.  Students develop strong technology skills and understand the links between theoretical and practical concepts in mathematics. For students interested in social sciences, natural sciences, medicine, statistics, business, engineering, some economics, psychology, design and other non-STEM fields.

Prerequisites: 1.0 Algebra 1 credit AND 1.0 Geometry credit

IB Math Applications and Interpretation SL A and B are taken in the first year of a two-year course that is part of the IB Diploma Programme. IB courses qualify for an extra 1.0 GPA quality point. 

THE IB-SPECIFIED CONTENT ADDRESSED IN THE FIRST YEAR OF IB MATH APPLICATIONS AND INTERPRETATION SL INCLUDES Right Triangle Trigonometry, Oblique Triangle Trigonometry and Volume, Descriptive Statistics on univariate data including data collection, Coordinate Geometry, Linear Functions including arithmetic sequences, Bivariate Data and Linear Models, Probability, and Exponential and Logarithmic Functions.  

ADDITIONAL SPS-SPECIFIED CONTENT INCLUDES Quadratic Functions, Operations with Complex Numbers and as solutions to quadratics, Operations on Polynomials, Polynomials functions, Rational exponents, Fitting Quadratic and exponential models to data, and Radian measure. This additional content includes material from Algebra 2 that is not in the IB SL content and addresses content required for SAT and college-readiness on the Smarter Balanced Assessment.

Course Name – Course Codes:

IB Math APPS SL C/D – HMA8144/HMA8145

Applications and Interpretations Standard Level Year 2

IB Math Applications and Interpretation SL C and D are two semesters of a four-part course series.  Completion of all four parts is one component of the IB Diploma Programme and prepares students to take the IB examination in May of their second year. This course emphasizes mathematical modeling and statistics. Students solve real-world problems, construct and communicate this mathematically and interpret the conclusions or generalizations. Students develop strong technology skills and understand the links between theoretical and practical concepts in mathematics. For students interested in social sciences, natural sciences, medicine, statistics, business, engineering, some economics, psychology, design and other non-STEM fields.

Prerequisite: IB Math Applications and Interpretation SL A and B.

IB Math Applications and Interpretations C and D are taken the second year of this two-year course that is part of the IB Diploma Programme. IB courses qualify for an extra 1.0 GPA quality point.

THE IB-SPECIFIED CONTENT ADDRESSED IN THE SECOND YEAR OF IB MATH APPLICATIONS AND INTERPRETATION SL INCLUDES Hypothesis Testing, chi-squared and t-tests, Power Functions, Trigonometric Functions, Differential Calculus – limits + derivatives, Introduction to Integration – finding area under the curve, and Binomial and Normal Distributions.

ADDITIONAL SPS-SPECIFIED CONTENT INCLUDES Absolute Value Functions, Parabola as conic section, Radical functions, and Rational Functions and applications. This additional content includes material from Algebra 2 that is not in the IB SL content and addresses content required for SAT and college-readiness on the Smarter Balanced Assessment.

Course Name – Course Codes:

MAT 107 Math In Society – HMA3868

One semester Math in Society college course. Introduces math topics used in a variety of liberal arts disciplines. Eligible students can earn Edmonds College credits.

Prerequisite: 1.0 Algebra 2 credit

Available to students in 10th to 12th grade

This one semester course is equivalent to a one-quarter Mathematics in Society college course. Students are eligible to earn 5.0 college credit after completing this course (tuition fees apply). This course introduces math topics used in a variety of liberal arts disciplines, such as mathematical modeling, representational statistics, probability, and finance math. Completion of this course with a D or higher fulfills the math graduation pathway requirement.

Note: College in the High School courses can be completed in one semester for 1.0 math credit.

Note: Teachers of this course must be approved as associate faculty with Edmonds College prior to teaching this course.

Other MAT 107 Math in Society courses

MAT107 Math in Society AB – HMA3869/HMA3870

This two semester course is equivalent to a one-quarter Math in Society college course.  Students are eligible to earn 5.0 college credit after completing these courses (tuition fees apply).  The content in these courses will mirror the content in the one semester course, but is presented over the full school year.

Course Name – Course Codes:

Modeling Our World with Mathematics A/B – HMA4558/HMA4559

This course will address standards from Algebra 1 and Geometry through a modeling lens. The course will present material to deepen students’ understanding of how mathematics can be used to represent and analyze the world around us.

Prerequisite: 1.0 Algebra 1 credit AND 1.0 Geometry credit

This course is a state-wide course developed by the Office Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI).  There are five units in Modeling our World with Mathematics. These units can be taught in any order. Two and a half units will be taught in each semester. The units are:  Civic Readiness, The Arts & Music, The Digital World, Health & Fitness, and Finances for Life. Teachers will use the lessons provided by OSPI, adhere to the philosophy described in the course materials, and implement the instructional routines recommended.

Learning Objectives:

Arts & Music: Students will explore the connection between Pythagorean Theorem, Right Triangle Trigonometry and its extension to the Unit Circle and Trigonometric Functions to model the wave properties. Students will use congruent and similar figures to model geometric transformations. Students will explore perspective drawings focusing on the role of parallel and perpendicular lines. Students focus on creating illusions and anamorphic art.

The Digital World: Students will model linear and exponential growth functions in the context of today’s digital world. Students will look at different aspects of cell phone use and how people use social media to make money. Students will use mathematics to model events such as how a social media post goes viral.

Finances for Life: Students will study mathematical models to understand payday/car loans, saving and investing, and using money management in order to be wise consumers as they plan for life-impact choices.

Civic Readiness: Students use statistics to explore if the voting process is a fair representation of the people as well as understanding civic issues such as air quality.

Health & Fitness: Students will use statistics and mathematical models to analyze the relationship between food nutrition, exercise, and overall health. Students will use mathematics to model the spread of a virus or the growth of world population.

Course Name – Course Codes:

Precalculus A/B – HMA2696/HMA2698

Students model and analyze real-world and mathematical situations using piece-wise, absolute value, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, polynomial, rational, and trigonometric functions.  Students extend their understanding of these functions through study of their inverses, reciprocals and composition of functions.  Students apply trigonometric and triangle relationships to prove trig identities.  Students use matrices as a tool to solve systems and vectors to model Physics applications.  Students represent conic sections algebraically and graphically.  Students extend their understanding of probability to evaluate outcomes of decisions. 

Prerequisite: 1.0 Geometry credit AND 1.0 Algebra 2 credit

Precalculus A is the first semester of a year-long Precalculus course. Students expand their understanding of functions to include piecewise, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Students use composition of functions to identify and find the inverse of a function. They investigate and identify the characteristics of exponential and logarithmic functions in order to graph these functions and solve equations and practical problems. This includes the role of e, natural and common logarithms, laws of exponents and logarithms, and the solutions of logarithmic and exponential equations. Students investigate and identify the characteristics of polynomial and rational functions and use these to sketch the graphs of the functions. They determine zeros (both real and complex), upper and lower bounds, y-intercepts, symmetry, asymptotes, intervals for which the function is increasing or decreasing, and maximum or minimum points. They deepen their understanding of the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra. Students use special triangles positioned within the unit circle to determine geometrically the values of sine, cosine, and tangent at special angles. Students expand their understanding of trigonometric ratios to include secant, cosecant, and cotangent ratios.  Students derive the Law of Sines and the Law of Cosines. They use previous knowledge and apply their understanding of the Pythagorean theorem and oblique triangles to discover these formulas and use them to solve problems. Students model periodic phenomena with trigonometric functions.  Students expand their understanding of trigonometric functions to include tangent, secant, cosecant, and cotangent. The inverse trigonometric functions are then used to solve trigonometric equations, evaluate their solutions using technology, and interpret these solutions in the appropriate contexts. 

Precalculus B is the second semester of a year-long Precalculus course. Students use established trigonometric identities to prove the Pythagorean identities, addition and subtraction identities, and double and half angle identities for sine, cosine, and tangent and use them to solve problems. Students learn the utility of representing linear transformations in the two-dimensional coordinate plane via matrices. Students examine the geometric effect of matrix operations—matrix product, matrix sum, and scalar multiplication. Students see that a system of linear equations can be represented as a single matrix equation, and that one can solve the system with the aid of the multiplicative inverse to a matrix if it exists. Students learn the formal definition of a vector and then explore the arithmetical work for vector addition, subtraction, scalar multiplication, and vector magnitude along with the geometrical frameworks for these operations. Students also solve problems involving velocity and other quantities that can be represented by vectors. Students learn the definition of conic sections as cross-sections of a cone and as being defined by geometric properties. Students develop equations to represent conic sections graphed on the coordinate plane and relate the equations to the geometric definitions. Students graph equations of conic sections and identify key features and properties of each. Students learn the special properties of each conic section and solve real-world problems involving these properties. Students generalize the multiplication rule for independent events to a rule that can be used to calculate the probability of the intersection of two events in situations where the two events are not independent. Students are also introduced to three techniques for counting outcomes—the fundamental counting principle, permutations, and combinations. These techniques are then used to calculate probabilities, and these probabilities are interpreted in context. Students study probability distributions for discrete random variables. For situations where the probabilities associated with a discrete random variable can be calculated given a description of the random variable, students determine the probability distribution. Students also see how empirical data can be used to approximate the probability distribution of a discrete random variable. Student learn the concept of expected value and calculate and interpret the expected value of discrete random variables in context. Students use probabilities to make a fair decision and analyze simple games of chance as they calculate and interpret the expected payoff in context. They make decisions based on expected values in problems with business, medical, and other contexts. 

Other Precalculus courses

Precalculus Lab A/B – HMA2710/HMA2711

Students may take this course concurrently with Precalculus. They may opt to take the course for extra support.  This course is designed to reteach Algebra 2 Standards necessary for success in Precalculus. These standards include solving and writing equations, graphing, and applications of the following functions: polynomial, exponential/logarithmic, rational, and trigonometric. The course involves re-teaching and pre-teaching of standards aligned with lessons in the Precalculus course.

Precalculus A/B H – HMA2697/HMA2699

Students model and analyze real-world and mathematical situations using piece-wise, absolute value, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, polynomial, rational, and trigonometric functions. Students extend their understanding of these functions through study of their inverses, reciprocals and composition of functions.  Students apply trigonometric and triangle relationships to prove trig identities. Students use matrices as a tool to solve systems and vectors to model Physics applications. Students represent conic sections algebraically and graphically. Students extend their understanding of probability to evaluate outcomes of decisions. 

Prerequisite: 1.0 Geometry credit AND 1.0 Algebra 2 credit

Precalculus A H is the first semester of a year-long honors Precalculus course. Students expand their understanding of functions to include piecewise, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Students use composition of functions to identify and find the inverse of a function. They investigate and identify the characteristics of exponential and logarithmic functions in order to graph these functions and solve equations and practical problems. This includes the role of e, natural and common logarithms, laws of exponents and logarithms, and the solutions of logarithmic and exponential equations. Students investigate and identify the characteristics of polynomial and rational functions and use these to sketch the graphs of the functions. They determine zeros (both real and complex), upper and lower bounds, y-intercepts, symmetry, asymptotes, intervals for which the function is increasing or decreasing, and maximum or minimum points. They deepen their understanding of the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra. Students use special triangles positioned within the unit circle to determine geometrically the values of sine, cosine, and tangent at special angles. Students expand their understanding of trigonometric ratios to include secant, cosecant, and cotangent ratios. Students derive the Law of Sines and the Law of Cosines. They use previous knowledge and apply their understanding of the Pythagorean theorem and oblique triangles to discover these formulas and use them to solve problems. Students model periodic phenomena with trigonometric functions.  Students expand their understanding of trigonometric functions to include tangent, secant, cosecant, and cotangent.  The inverse trigonometric functions are then used to solve trigonometric equations, evaluate their solutions using technology, and interpret these solutions in the appropriate contexts. 

Precalculus B H is the second semester of a year-long honors Precalculus course. Students use established trigonometric identities to prove the Pythagorean identities, addition and subtraction identities, and double and half angle identities for sine, cosine, and tangent and use them to solve problems. Students learn the utility of representing linear transformations in the two-dimensional coordinate plane via matrices. Students examine the geometric effect of matrix operations—matrix product, matrix sum, and scalar multiplication. Students see that a system of linear equations can be represented as a single matrix equation, and that one can solve the system with the aid of the multiplicative inverse to a matrix if it exists.  Students learn the formal definition of a vector and then explore the arithmetical work for vector addition, subtraction, scalar multiplication, and vector magnitude along with the geometrical frameworks for these operations. Students also solve problems involving velocity and other quantities that can be represented by vectors. Students learn the definition of conic sections as cross-sections of a cone and as being defined by geometric properties. Students develop equations to represent conic sections graphed on the coordinate plane and relate the equations to the geometric definitions. Students graph equations of conic sections and identify key features and properties of each. Students learn the special properties of each conic section and solve real-world problems involving these properties. Students generalize the multiplication rule for independent events to a rule that can be used to calculate the probability of the intersection of two events in situations where the two events are not independent. Students are also introduced to three techniques for counting outcomes—the fundamental counting principle, permutations, and combinations. These techniques are then used to calculate probabilities, and these probabilities are interpreted in context. Students study probability distributions for discrete random variables. For situations where the probabilities associated with a discrete random variable can be calculated given a description of the random variable, students determine the probability distribution. Students also see how empirical data can be used to approximate the probability distribution of a discrete random variable. Student learn the concept of expected value and calculate and interpret the expected value of discrete random variables in context. Students use probabilities to make a fair decision and analyze simple games of chance as they calculate and interpret the expected payoff in context. They make decisions based on expected values in problems with business, medical, and other contexts.

Course Name – Course Codes:

Probability and Statistics A/B – HMA1763/HMA1764

Probability and Statistics is a year-long course in which students build on the foundational probability and statistics concepts learned in prior courses. Students will deepen their understanding of data analysis, permutations and combinations, probability and frequency distributions, measures of central tendency and dispersion, sampling distributions, and hypothesis testing. 

Prerequisite: 1.0 Algebra 2 credit

Students understand probability is a description of the likelihood of the different outcomes of a random process.  Students find the theoretical probability for the outcomes of a random process by first identifying sample spaces.  Students calculate the probability of simple and compound events, identify if events are independent, calculate conditional probabilities, and calculate and interpret binomial probabilities.  Students will apply counting principles and determine permutations and combinations.  Students can determine the probability distribution of a random variable and calculate its expected value.  Students determine experimental probabilities by designing and conducting simulations. Students understand the relationship between experimental and theoretical probability through the Law of Large Numbers.

Students display and describe one and two variable quantitative and categorical data. Students will analyze data by calculating summary statistics including measures of center and spread.  Students will display data graphically (for example in a histogram or scatterplot) and describe the key features.  Students determine the appropriate measures of central tendency and measures of variability based on the nature of the data. Students compare two or more data sets using summary statistics.  Students understand the purpose of a statistical study including surveys and experiments.  Students understand the principles of study design including the role of randomization and sampling.  Students analyze studies to identify possible sources of bias.  Students make inferences about a population based on sample data using probability reasoning. Students estimate population parameters from sample statistics by creating confidence intervals.  Students evaluate claims about a population parameter by conducting a hypothesis test.  Students understand the conditions under which inferences are valid.