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    Family Guide to Supporting Your M-P Leveled Reader in Informational Text

    What is Leveled Reading?

    Elementary teachers use various tools to determine reading proficiency, including comprehension, fluency, accuracy and stamina. Students reach higher levels in the alphabet, A-Z, as their proficiency increases.

    Characteristics of Informational Text at Levels M-P

    • More mature themes and topics that go well beyond children’s own experience
    • Ideas and language are more complex
    • Small print and reduced word spacing
    • Sophisticated and varied vocabulary; many words require background knowledge for comprehension

    Readers should be working on these skills at Levels M-P

    • Using multiple sources of information to figure out tricky words
    • Remembering details from one section of text to the next
    • Acquiring new vocabulary through reading
    • Making connections between the text read and other books

    How to help: Possible questions and prompts to ask your child

    Before Reading

    • “What do you already know about this topic? What do you want to learn?”
    • “How can you use a text feature to help you locate information? Show me.”
    • “What have you experienced in your life that helps you understand this topic?”

    While Reading

    • “What are you finding of interest in this topic?”
    • “How does this information fit with what you already know?”
    • “What are some of the most important words related to this topic and what do they mean?”
    • “How is this information organized?”
    • “Is the author using compare and contrast? Cause and effect? Sequencing? Describe.”
    • “Try saying the first part of the word, then the next, then the end.”
    • “What’s the big idea described in this chapter? How does it fit in with what you’ve already read so far?”

    After Reading

    • “Describe the main ideas and key details this book is organized around.”
    • “What questions would you ask the author if you ever had the opportunity to meet him/her?”
    • “After reading the book, would you consider reading more on the topic in the future? Why or why not?”
    • “How does this book remind you of other texts you have read?”
    • “Why did the author write this book? How do you know?”
    • “What useful information does this text provide?”
    • “What perspective does the author take on this topic? You?”
    • “Were there parts of the book you didn’t understand? What puzzled you? What questions do you still have?”
    • “What does the author want us to think about the issues in this book?”


    Family Guide to Supporting Your M-P Leveled Reader in Literary Text

    What is Leveled Reading? Elementary teachers use various tools to determine reading proficiency, including comprehension, fluency, accuracy and stamina. Students reach higher levels in the alphabet, A-Z, as their proficiency increases.

    Characteristics of Literary Text at Levels M-P

    • Complex language and subtle meanings that require interpretation and background knowledge
    • Small print and reduced word spacing
    • More mature themes and topics that go well beyond children’s own experience
    • Vocabulary is sophisticated and varied

    Readers should be working on these skills at Levels M-P

    • Applying word solving strategies to more complex, multisyllabic words
    • Sustaining attention to a longer text, remembering details and revising thinking
    • Demonstrating sophisticated interpretations of characters and plot

    How to help: Possible questions and prompts to ask your child

    Before Reading

    • “Does the title/topic remind you of anything you know or have done?”
    • “What questions would you like to ask the author before you read this book?”
    • “What are you wondering about as you look at the cover and back of your book?”

    While Reading

    • “Tell me the most important things you have read thus far in order of how they happened.”
    • “What does the author mean when he/she said _____? Why do you think this?”
    • “Do you think it will be important to remember this? Why?”
    • “What must have happened here that the author didn’t tell us?”
    • “What do you know about this character. Show me a part where you thought that about this person.”
    • “Tell me what you were imagining in your mind as you read that page/paragraph.”
    • “This passage is a comparison (point out a simile or metaphor). What is the author comparing here and why?”
    • “What will be the most important thing for us to remember in what we read today?”
    • “Reread this part again trying to read it in longer phrases.”
    • “What’s another word or group of words that would make sense here?”

    After Reading

    • “Was ___ a good title for this book? Why or why not?”
    • "Are there some parts of this story that are more important than others? Which ones? Why are they most important?”
    • “What is the most important point the author is trying to make in his or her writing? What information from the text tells you that you are correct?”
    • “Talk about your own point of view and how it is similar/different from that of the narrator? The characters?”
    • “If this story had a sequel, what do you think it would be about?”