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    Family Guide to Supporting Your D-H Leveled Reader in Informational Text

    What is Leveled Reading? Elementary teachers use various tools to determine reading proficiency, including comprehension, fluency, accuracy and stamina. Students reach higher levels in the alphabet, A-Z, as their proficiency increases.

    Characteristics of Informational Text at Levels D-H

    • More pages, or more lines of text on a page
    • More difficult ideas and concepts
    • Language patterns are more characteristic of written language than of spoken language
    • Vocabulary is more challenging, greater range of words and more difficult words
    • Greater variety of styles of text layout

    Readers should be working on these skills at Levels D-H

    • Tracking print with eyes, using finger only at points of difficulty
    • Figuring out longer words by taking them apart
    • Using knowledge of sounds/letters and word parts to figure out words
    • Using pictures for information
    • Stopping to think or talk about ideas


    How to help: Possible questions and prompts to ask your child

    Before Reading

    • “What is the title of this book?”
    • “What does the cover tell you about the book?”
    • “Take a look at the photographs or illustrations. Do you find any interesting? What do you want to learn?”
    • “Look over the table of contents. What information did you gather?”

    While Reading

    • “What do you think the phrase __________ means?”
    • “What does the word ______ mean? How do you know?”
    • “Why did the author bold certain words and not others? Explain what one word means and how you know.”
    • “What were some key details in the section/chapter _________?”
    • “Look at the picture on page ____. What information did you learn from it?”
    • “Check the picture and use the first letter of the word to help you.”
    • “Does that look right and make sense?”
    • “What do you know that can help you here?” (could be something child knows about topic, genre, etc.)
    • “Watch how I find information in the story (or pictures) to support my idea about this topic.”

    After Reading

    • “What type of book is this? Explain.”
    • “What fact(s) did you enjoy learning the most? Can you show me the part in the text where you found these facts or information?”
    • “Why did the author include headings? How did this help you?”
    • “Turn to the glossary. What information is listed here?”
    • “Choose a word from the glossary, explain what it means, and use it in a sentence.”


    Family Guide to Supporting Your D-H Leveled Reader in Literary Text

    What is Leveled Reading? Elementary teachers use various tools to determine reading proficiency, including comprehension, fluency, accuracy and stamina. Students reach higher levels in the alphabet, A-Z, as their proficiency increases.

    Characteristics of Literary Text at Levels D-H

    • Sentences carry over several pages and use a full range of punctuation
    • Compound words & multi-syllable words
    • Pictures continue to support reading, but closer attention to print is required
    • More dialogue and varied print
    • Elaborate plots and characters

    Readers should be working on these skills at Levels D-H

    • Recognizing many words quickly and automatically
    • Reading fluently, with phrasing
    • Figuring out some longer words by taking them apart
    • Noticing and using punctuation to assist smooth reading
    • Rereading to figure out words, self-correct, or improve expression
    • Stopping to think or talk about ideas
    • Visualizing the story to compensate for fewer pictures

    How to help: Possible questions and prompts to ask your child

    Before Reading

    • "What clues does the title give me about the story?"
    • "What do you already know about___?"
    • “What characters do you think might be in our story?”
    • “Let’s take a picture walk… Talk about what the illustrations are showing.”
    • “What do you think is going to happen? Why?”

    While Reading

    • “Who/what is the story about so far?”
    • “When you were reading this part, what were you picturing in your head?”
    • “Why do you think the character did that?”
    • “Who is telling the story at this point in the text?”
    • “What do you think will happen next? Why?”
    • “Listen as I read this part smoothly without using my finger… now you try it.”
    • “Listen as I use punctuation to stop (.), raise my voice at the end (?), sound excited (!).”
    • “Stop and picture what’s going on here. I’ll start…”
    • “Let’s think about this section and look back through the pages to help us think about what happened so far in the story.”

    After Reading

    “Tell me the story in your own words.” (Retell should include description of main characters, settings, and major events).
    “What was your favorite part of the story? Why?”
    “Show me the part in the story where/when…”
    “How does the illustration on page ___ help you to understand the characters, setting, and/or events?”
    “What is the central message or lesson of this story?”
    “Did you like this book? Explain.”