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    Informational Text

    What is Leveled Reading?

    Elementary teachers use various tools to determine reading proficiency, including comprehension, fluency, accuracy and stamina. Students reach higher levels in the alphabet, A-Z, as their proficiency increases. 

    Characteristics of Informational Text at Levels A-C

    • Simple labels or captions
    • Clear, easy-to-read print with adequate space
      between words
    • Patterned text
    • Unknown content words are supported by the
      picture
    • Topics are familiar to most children

    Readers should be working on these skills at Levels A-C

    • Reading accurately (not adding or omitting
      words)
    • Reading left to right and not skipping lines
    • Using visual information, such as the first letter
      of the word, to read words
    • Rereading to confirm or figure out new words
    • Using picture details to help figure out words

    How to help: Possible questions and prompts to ask your child

    Before Reading

    • “What is the title of this book?”
    • “Watch how I read the title; look at the picture, and think,
    • “What might this book be about?”
    • “What does the cover tell you about the book?”
    • “Tell me about the job of the author? The illustrator?”
    • “Show me the front cover, back cover, and title page.”

    While Reading

    • “What does the word ____ mean?”
    • “Why does the author include the illustration on page ___?”
    • “Tell me an important key detail that we just read?”
    • “What’s going on here?”
    • “Read it again and see if it makes sense.”
    • “Notice how I keep my finger on a word until I say each part of it.”
    • “Watch how I find information in the story (or pictures) to support my idea about
      _____.”

    After Reading

    • “What is this book/story about? What do you think the author wanted you to learn
      by reading it?”
    • “Tell me what you learned in this book.”
    • “What are some important key details that tell about the main idea of this book?”
    • “What was most interesting about this book? Why?”
    • “Explain how _____ works. Show me where you found the information.”
    • “Name two characteristics of _____. Explain how this is related to _____.”
    • “What caused _____ to happen?”
    • “Would you like to read more books about this topic? Why or why not?”
    • “Why did you say that? Show me evidence that tells why you think that.”

    Literary Text

    What is Leveled Reading?

    Elementary teachers use various tools to determine reading proficiency, including comprehension, fluency, accuracy and stamina. Students reach higher levels in the alphabet, A-Z, as their proficiency increases.

    Characteristics of Literary Text at Levels A-C

    • Repeating language patterns
    • Words are supported by the picture
    • Print is clear and readable with adequate space between words
    • Includes many high frequency words
    • Simple story lines and topics that are familiar to most children

    Readers should be working on these skills at Levels A-C

    • Reading accurately (not adding or omitting words)
    • Reading left to right and not skipping lines
    • Using visual information, such as the first letter of the word, to read words
    • Noticing detail in pictures
    • Demonstrating awareness of punctuation by pausing and some phrasing

    How to help: Possible questions and prompts to ask your child

     

    Before Reading

    • “What is the title of this book?”
    • “Look at the cover. Talk about what you see/notice.”
    • “Think about the cover to get your mind ready to read.”
    • “Look at the title page. Talk about this.”
    • “Who is the author? Who is the illustrator? What do they do?
    • “Let’s take a picture walk. Talk about the illustrations and what is happening.”

    While Reading

    Ask the child to read the text, pointing to the words as they read. Make sure that the child matches one spoken word to one written word.

    • “Who are the main characters?”
    • “What is the setting in the story?”
    • “What are the major events in this story (so far)?
    • “Who/what is the story about?”
    • “Check the picture and use the first letter of the word to help you.”
    • “Listen as I read this part smoothly… now you try it.”
    • “Notice how I touch under a word, read it, and move quickly to the next word.”

    After Reading

    • “What happened in the story?”
    • “Look at the illustration on page __. What moment in the story does the picture show? Tell me about it.”
    • "Is this a real or imaginary story? How do you know?”
    • “Does the story remind you of anything? Explain.”
    • “After I finish a book, I think about it. Watch me as I do this.”
    • “If this story had a sequel, what do you think it would be about?”