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    Small Works Roster Frequently Asked Questions

    What is Small Works?

    The district is authorized by RCW (Revised Code of Washington) RCW 39.04.155 to use a Small Works process to award contracts for construction, building, renovation, remodeling, alternation, repair, or improvement of real property. The Small Works process can be used in lieu of other procedures – such as sealed bids – to award contracts for such work with an estimated cost of $200,000 or less. The district maintains a Small Works Roster by trade and by alphabetical listing of firm names.

    How does the district use the Small Works Roster?

    Projects expected to cost under $40,000 are first offered to the district’s Maintenance Department. If Maintenance determines that it does not have the available resources to perform the work within the schedule, then the job can become a Small Works job. Contractors who submit completed, signed applications are placed on the district’s Small Works Roster by trade specialties. When a Small Works project becomes available, the district sends out requests for quotes via email to firms on the Small Works Roster by trade specialties. The district then selects the lowest responsible, responsive quote from contractors who have responded.

    I’m a contractor and I’ve been awarded a Small Works project. Do I need to provide proof of fingerprinting?

    Yes. A contractor working on a Small Works project must provide proof of fingerprinting for each employee identified to work on a specific project.

    When are bid bonds, performance and payment bonds, and retainage required for Small Works Roster projects?

    Bid bonds, performance and payment bonds, and retainage are not required for projects estimated to cost under $35,000. Performance and payment bonds are required for projects estimated to cost $35,000 or more.

    5. What changes in the last two years have there been on retainage and release?

    The 2009 Legislature added industrial insurance to the retainage and release laws for public works projects. For public improvement projects greater than $35,000, completed after September 30, 2009, the Washington State Department of Labor and Industries (L & I) must certify that contractors have paid their industrial insurance premiums before a public agency can release the retained contract amount. If premiums are unpaid, L & I can collect the debt from the retained amount. For these contracts, the public agency cannot pay any retained funds to the contractor until L & I has approved the release or the payment. For more information about retainage release, visit the L & I website

    I’m a contractor planning to start work on a project, and I’ve turned in all of the required documentation, including proof of insurance and proof of fingerprinting, to the district. Can I start work on the project before I receive a Notice to Proceed (NTP) letter from the district?

    No.

    I’m a contractor, I’ve received an NTP letter from the district, and I’ve started work on the project. What documentation do I need to provide before I receive partial payment?

    As a public agency, the district is required to obtain an approved L & I Intent to Pay Prevailing Wages letter from the contractor before releasing the first project payment. This means that a contractor must provide this letter as well as an accurate invoice to the district before receiving any payment. More information about L & I is available on the L & I website.

    A sample of the Intent to Pay Prevailing Wages form is available on the L & I website.

    I’m a contractor and I’ve finished work on a project. What documentation do I need to provide before I receive my final payment?

    As a public agency, the district is required to obtain an approved L & I prevailing wage affidavit prior to releasing final payment for all projects, and before releasing any retention for projects over $35,000. Contractors must provide this document as well as an accurate invoice to the district before receiving final payment.