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    Social Emotional Learning Videos

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    Social Emotional Learning Activities

    1 Page Printable Activities

    K –1st Grade

    2nd- 3rd Grade

    4th- 5th Grade

    General Ed.

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    General Ed.

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     Our Hands    Friendship   5th Grade Transition   
     How I Helped          
     Thank You Notes          
     Character Problem Solving
             
     What to do?          

     

    Social Emotional Skills for School Closure 

    It’s normal for children and adults to respond to the uncertainty of this time with a range of feelings and needs. We hope the 3 simple tips below might help create daily routines for supporting your household's wellness.

    Keep scrolling for middle and high school.

    Be an Emotion Scientist
    Noticing how you feel makes it easier to make choices you feel proud of. 

    K - 1st

    2nd - 3rd

    4th - 5th

    Say how you feel! To figure out how you feel you can pay attention to:

    • How your body feels
    • Your thoughts
    • Your emotions

     

    Once a day, say how you feel to yourself or to the people around you. To figure out how you feel you can observe:

    • How your body feels
    • Your thoughts
    • Your emotions

    Notice if saying your feeling changes how you feel.

    Once a day, become aware of how you feel. Observe:

    • Your body sensations
    • Your thoughts
    • Your emotions

    Consider how your feelings affect what you’re doing. Decide if you’d like to keep the feeling you’re having or shift to a different feeling. Decide what you’ll do to keep or change your feeling.

    Set Goals and Celebrate Accomplishing Them
    Persevering, learning from mistakes, and paying attention to what works helps us accomplish the things we need to get done. Celebrating makes it more fun!

    K - 1st 

    2nd - 3rd 

    4th - 5th 

    Set goals and celebrate accomplishing them!
    Each day think about one thing you’d like to do such as a household chore, an outside activity, or a learning activity. As you do that activity notice that you’re accomplishing your goal!

    Celebrate by telling yourself you’ve done a great job.

    On days you don’t accomplish your goal, forgive yourself and try again another day!

    You may have household chores, schoolwork and physical activities to do each day.

    Set 1 or 2 goals for yourself each day. Examples are reading or moving your body for 20 minutes. Make a plan to accomplish your goals by writing down when you’ll do them.

    Celebrate when you accomplish your goal by telling yourself you’ve done a great job!

    On days you don’t accomplish your goal, forgive yourself and try again!

    You may have household chores, schoolwork and physical activities to do and you get to set goals and create plans for doing those things. Set 2-3 goals for each week and create a plan to accomplish them. Write down your goals and the tasks you’ll do each day. You might plan when you’ll do the things on your list.

    Celebrate each time you complete a task on your plan by telling yourself you’re making great progress!

    When you don’t complete a task, forgive yourself and start again. Celebrate when you accomplish your week’s goals by noticing how you feel and reflecting on what you did well! Share your accomplishments with the people around you!

    Solve Problems with Kindness
    Problems give us a chance to practice listening, empathy, and saying what we need.

     K - 1st  2nd - 3rd  4th - 5th

    As you play and learn there will be problems. Problems give you a chance to be your “best self”. To be your best self you can:

    • Notice how you and others feel

    • Listen to other people’s ideas

    • Say your ideas and ask for help with kindness

    When you are being your “best self” you and the people around you might feel better and have more fun!

    As you play, work, and learn there will be problems. Problems give you a chance to be your “best self”. To be your best self you can:

    • Notice how you and others feel

    • Listen to other people’s ideas

    • Say your ideas and ask for help with kindness

    You might need to take a Meta Moment and pause if you’re feeling upset. That will help you speak kindly and have empathy for those around you. When you are being your “best self” you can do two important things: solve the problem and feel proud of being kind. You and the people around you might have more fun together too!

    As you play, work, and learn there will be problems. Problems give you a chance to be your “best self”. To be your best self you can:

    • Notice how you and others feel by saying how you feel and having empathy for others

    • Listen to other people’s ideas

    • Say your ideas and ask for help with kindness. You might use “I statements” such as, “I feel frustrated because I want a turn, can I please go next?” or “I don’t understand this, can you please explain it to me?”

    You might need to take a Meta Moment and pause if you’re feeling upset. Remember the strategies that help you most. They might be taking a deep breath, getting a drink of water, or telling yourself that you can do hard things. When you are being your “best self” you can do two important things: solve the problem and feel proud of yourself for being kind. You might learn a little about what helps to solve problems at home and what doesn’t. You can keep track of what works and practice those things alone or with the people around you. Being your “best self” and solving problems with kindness will help you have more fun and feel better with people at home.

     

    Self Awareness & Your Emotions

    Middle School

    High School

    Each day monitor your emotions through an emotion check in with yourself or others. Talk about how you are feeling and why, and work to label these emotions. Also, recognize how you demonstrate these feelings through your body and thoughts so that you can increase your self-awareness

     

    Recognize your personal triumphs in how you are dealing with your moods and emotions during this time. Exchange with others the techniques or habits that are helping you and to get ideas.

     

    Talk to a trusted adult if you are feeling anxious or down, or if you recognize that someone you know is having a hard time mentally or emotionally.

    Monitor your emotions through an emotion check in with yourself or others. Talk about how you are feeling and why, and work to label these emotions. Recognize how you demonstrate feelings so that you can increase your sense of self-awareness.

     

     

    Consider limiting the things that trigger your negative emotions, such as an excess of news.

     

     

    Download a mindfulness app and set an alarm each day to take a mindful moment. Practicing mindfulness will help you identify and regulate your emotional state, as well help with more complex emotions and/or struggles such as depression and anxiety. Be sure to reach out to a trusted adult if you are experiencing symptoms of these.

     

    Set Goals & Celebrate Accomplishing Them

    Middle School

    High School

    Set daily or weekly goals that are realistic and provide a sense of accomplishment. Write these down or find an accountability partner. Avoid taking on too much and do focus on self-care so that you remain motivated. Begin with 1-2 goals and be sure to share these with others as well as celebrate when you achieve them!

     

    Examples of goals can be academic, like reading or completing math problems online, exercising for 20 minutes each day, or assisting with chores.

     

    Reward yourself and celebrate when you reach your goals, but if you don’t practice self-compassion and forgiveness, but always persevere!

    Set 2-3 daily or weekly goals that fuel your academic, social, emotional, and physical well-being. Consider starting an accountability group with your family or friends using an app. Don’t be afraid to keep things simple!

     

    Identify and choose your strengths when establishing your goals so that you remain motivated. For example, if you really like fitness, set goals related to exercising for a certain amount of time each day. As the days move on, also recognize your limitations and areas in which you’d like to improve. If you are disorganized, think about setting goals such as cleaning your room and helping around the house. And if you have younger siblings, try and help them set their own goals or work together on the same ones.

     

    Reward yourself and celebrate when you reach your goals, but if you don’t practice self-compassion and forgiveness, but always persevere!

    Solve Problems Effectively

    Middle School

    High School

    Remember that having problems or arguments with others are a normal part of life. Practice positive, consistent communication and work with others on coming together to make peace and find solutions.

     

    Focus on positive self-talk and practicing kindness and patience when solving personal or social problems.

     

    Work with others to explore differences as to why problems arise in order to increase understanding and empathy. For example, when you realize that you and others have a different view of a situation, you both may be able to focus on how those differences impacted your perspectives. Come together to make peace and verbalize your understanding.

    Conflicts with others is a natural part of life. Work on effectively communicating with others when conflict arises and do so keeping in mind the words you choose and keeping them clear and kind. Maintain respect for yourself and others!

     

    Work together to explore differing perspectives of what happened and why each person sees and experiences things differently. Consider feelings and how past experiences may have impacted everyone. Stay solution focused and identify ones that leave everyone feeling they can move forward.

     

    When you experience problems within yourself or with others, be sure to identify solutions that keep you and others safe and avoid bringing further emotional or physical harm.

    What is Social Emotional Learning?

    Social and emotional learning (SEL) is the process through which children & adults understand & manage emotions, set & achieve positive goals, feel & show empathy for others, establish & maintain positive relationships, & make responsible decisions.   CASEL 2019

    What does SPS believe about social emotional learning skills? 

    We at Seattle Public Schools believe that social emotional learning skills are at the heart of academic growth, thriving relationships, intentional decision making, and well-being. Our SEL Framework aligns to WA state SEL Standards including: self and social awareness, self and social management, self-efficacy, and social engagement. SEL skills will be explicitly taught, integrated with academic instruction, practiced by staff and demonstrated organizationally so that everyone feels welcome, safe, and known as valued members of SPS communities. 

    WA SEL STANDARDS

    Self-Awareness

    Identifying one’s emotions, personal assets, areas for growth, and potential external resources and supports.

    Social Awareness

    Taking the perspective of and empathizing with others from diverse backgrounds and cultures.

    Self-Management

    Regulating emotions, thoughts, and behaviors.

    Social Management

    Making safe and constructive choices about personal behavior and social interactions.

    Self-Efficacy

    Motivating oneself, persevering, and see oneself as capable.

    Social Engagement

    Considering others and showing a desire to contribute to the well-being of school and community.

     

    Social Emotional Learning Skill instruction has been shown to: 

    - Improve students' attitudes about self, others, and school
    - Result in positive classroom behavior
    - Increase standardized test achievement
    - Positively impact school safety 
    - Reduce emotional stress
       CASEL

    Mood Meter Box of four colors from the top left, red, yellow, green and blue

    RULER is an evidence-based approach to social and emotional learning (SEL) developed at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence. RULER builds the skills of emotional intelligence and supports a positive school climate. It’s currently used in about 70 Seattle Public Schools, primarily elementary and middle schools.

    RULER is an acronym for the five skills of emotional intelligence:

    Recognizing emotions in oneself and others
    Understanding the causes and consequences of emotions
    Labeling emotions with a nuanced vocabulary
    Expressing emotions in accordance with cultural norms and social context
    Regulating emotions with helpful strategies

     

    Students

    Social Emotional Guidance for Closure

    Elementary
    Everyday Social Emotional Skills Guidance for Families

    Printable

    Middle & High School
    Everyday Social Emotional Skills Guidance for Families

    Printable

    Staff

    Social Emotional Support for Closure

    School Leader Wellness

    Staff Wellness 

    Parents/Guardians

    Social Emotional Support for Closure

    Parent Wellness
    from Seattle Children's
    UW & Harborview


     

    SPS Resources for COVID-19

    SPS COVID-19 Response

     

    External Resources for COVID-19

    Mental Health and Coping During COVID-19
    Centers for Disease Control

    Helping Children and Teens Cope with the Anxiety of COVID-19
    Seattle Children’s

    Coronavirus and Parenting: What You Need to Know
    NPR

    Parent Toolkit
    NBC News Learn

     

    CONTACTS 

    Kai Kunkel
    SEL Skills Coordinator
    kbkunkel@seattleschools.org

    Hyam Elsaharty
    SEL Skills Coordinating Teacher
    hselsaharty@seattleschools.org

    Lisa Love
    Health Education Manager
    llove@seattleschools.org