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International Education

Overview


Seattle's International Schools provide students with linguistic skills, higher-order thinking skills, and a global perspective that will help them to contribute to, and succeed in, a 21st century world.

International Schools help students engage in intellectually rigorous schoolwork and prepare them for college, career and life. 

International Schools help close both the academic achievement gap as well as the “global achievement gap.”

Download the SPS International Education Brochure (PDF).


Vision for International Education

Our vision is to prepare students, in partnership with families and community, for global citizenship in an increasingly interdependent world.

International Education Graphic


Preparing Global Citizens

  • RCW 28A.150.210: Basic Education - Goals of School Districts
    "A basic education is an evolving program of instruction that is intended to provide students with the opportunity to become responsible and respectful global citizens, to contribute to their economic well-being and that of their families and communities, to explore and understand different perspectives, and to enjoy productive and satisfying lives."
    (emphasis added)

Components of International Education


Global Competence Matrix

21st Century Skills 


 

Current Initiatives


  • Expansion of the International School pathways. We expect to add one more elementary school in the Southwest region and a high school in the Southeast region.
  • Ongoing professional development for principals and staff of International Schools in the components of International Education.
  • Development of the International Schools Leadership Team (ISLT) with representation by teacher leaders from each of the International Schools.
  • Development of model units and resources for Dual Immersion language programs in Japanese, Mandarin, and Spanish.
  • Hosting and leadership of the Confucius Institute of the State of Washington.


Upcoming...


Frequently Asked Questions

Q1: What are the International Schools Pathways?
A: The concept of a pathway is that a student entering an International School in elementary school would be able to continue in that International Education program into middle school, and that middle school students would be able to continue on to high school. A good example is the International Schools pathway in the Southwest region: Concord International School feeds into Denny International Middle School, which feeds into Chief Sealth International High School.

Sometimes, however, the district enrollment office has had to make changes to accommodate shifts of programs or populations. In the Northwest region, the two elementary schools, John Stanford International School and McDonald International School, feed into Hamilton International Middle School, but Hamilton, as a school, feeds into Roosevelt High School (which is not an International School), not into Ingraham High School, which is a designated International School. The compromise has been to offer students who began in elementary school the opportunity for a K-12 pathway, i.e., from John Stanford (and in two years, McDonald) to Hamilton, then on to Ingraham. This can be confusing, but the district is working to ensure that Ingraham has a complete list of 8th graders from Hamilton who originally completed grade 5 at John Stanford since these students are entitled to register for Ingraham if they choose.

Q2: What about if a student did not attend an elementary International School, but joined the Immersion Continuation language program at Hamilton. Can that student be placed at Ingraham?
A: Yes. If a student has demonstrated language proficiency at a level expected for placement in the Immersion Continuation classes at Hamilton, then that student may also be placed at Ingraham.  

Q3: Will there be other International Schools pathways?
A:
Yes. The next pathway being developed is in the Southeast region. Beacon Hill International School and Dearborn Park International School feed into Mercer International Middle School. (Both Dearborn Park and Mercer were just designated International Schools in September 2014.) Mercer currently feeds into Franklin High School, but a decision has not been made yet at the district regarding where to locate the next International High School. The expectation is that the high school will be identified this year and will begin a "pre-planning" year next year (2015-2016).

Q4: Can students from other countries enroll in Seattle Public Schools?
A: 
 Visit the district Enrollment web page: Enrollment Services: International Services. It is the practice of the Seattle School District to admit as a student any person, regardless of national origin or citizenship, upon documentation that the student or parent/guardian resides within the boundaries of the Seattle School District. The Seattle School District will not provide legal advice to families on immigration related issues. Please see the I-20 document and F1 brochure for the process and requirements to apply for F-1 visa status, and registration information for International Students to attend a Seattle Public High School. For more information, contact Faauu Manu fmmanu@seattleschools.org 206 252-0205. For students seeking to attend school as exchange students on the J-1 visa, see the district policy  and procedure regarding International Student Exchange for more information.

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